On the 24 July 1567 Mary, Queen of Scots was forced to abdicate the throne.
Lords Ruthven and Lindsay visited Mary while she was held at Loch Leven castle and threatened her with immediate execution if she did not sign the abdication papers there and then. Unsurprisingly, Mary abdicated, leaving her infant son James as monarch and her half-brother Moray as Regent.

On the 24 July 1567 Mary, Queen of Scots was forced to abdicate the throne.

Lords Ruthven and Lindsay visited Mary while she was held at Loch Leven castle and threatened her with immediate execution if she did not sign the abdication papers there and then. Unsurprisingly, Mary abdicated, leaving her infant son James as monarch and her half-brother Moray as Regent.

Sunset at Harlaw Monument 
This day in 1411 saw the Battle of Harlaw, near Inverurie.
The battle was fought between the Crown forces under the Earl of Mar and a Highland army led by Donald, Lord of the Isles. Heavy casualties were inflicted on both sides but victory went to the Royal forces as the Highlanders withdrew. The city of Aberdeen suffered heavy losses with the death of Provost Robert Davidson and many of the City Burgesses fighting on the Crown side. Get more details of the battle here from Wiki http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Harlaw

Sunset at Harlaw Monument

This day in 1411 saw the Battle of Harlaw, near Inverurie.

The battle was fought between the Crown forces under the Earl of Mar and a Highland army led by Donald, Lord of the Isles. Heavy casualties were inflicted on both sides but victory went to the Royal forces as the Highlanders withdrew. The city of Aberdeen suffered heavy losses with the death of Provost Robert Davidson and many of the City Burgesses fighting on the Crown side. Get more details of the battle here from Wiki http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Harlaw

fuckitandmovetobritain:

Glen Coe, Scottish Highlands, Scotland, UK

fuckitandmovetobritain:

Glen Coe, Scottish Highlands, Scotland, UK

theblueandwhiteknight:

The cone is here to stay!!!

Source 

theblueandwhiteknight:

The cone is here to stay!!!

Source 

Good Morning from Scotland

Good Morning from Scotland

The Glasgay Kiss- shows there is a lot to be proud of in Scotland

The Glasgay Kiss- shows there is a lot to be proud of in Scotland

Nervous

My girlfiend gets home from hospital tommorow, 58 days after her stroke, the staff in the hospital in Stirling say they reckon it is the fastest turnaround they recall. She can only walk short distances and her right hand is not so good yet, at least she will be home though, we have a long journey to recovery though

scotianostra:

Looking down on the gatehouse at Edinburgh Castle on a busy Saturday at the Statues of two Scottish Icons. It is fitting that the two greatest heroes in Scottish history should look down from the walls on either side of the entrance to the Castle. The bronze statues were placed on niches in the gatehouse of the castle in 1929. Sir William Wallaceon the right was the first leader of the Scots to rebel against the rule of the English King Edward I who had over-run Scotland in 1296. After a geurilla campaign, Wallace appeared to be successful when he defeated the English army at Stirling Bridge in 1297. But the freedom was short-lived and Wallace and the Scots army were defeated at Falkirk in 1298. It is important to remember that Wallace was not fighting to gain the throne of Scotland but in order to free the country from English domination. It is for that reason, as well as the heroic battles, that he has been put on a pedestal over the years (both literally, with many statues, and metaphorically). Robert the Bruce was initially prepared to kneel before King Edward of England but in 1306 he declared himself king of Scotland. His fight against the English was long and hard and it took until the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314 to fully set Scotland free - at least for a time.

Resurectinng an old feature, first posted over a year ago.

scotianostra:

Looking down on the gatehouse at Edinburgh Castle on a busy Saturday at the Statues of two Scottish Icons. It is fitting that the two greatest heroes in Scottish history should look down from the walls on either side of the entrance to the Castle. The bronze statues were placed on niches in the gatehouse of the castle in 1929.

Sir William Wallaceon the right was the first leader of the Scots to rebel against the rule of the English King Edward I who had over-run Scotland in 1296. After a geurilla campaign, Wallace appeared to be successful when he defeated the English army at Stirling Bridge in 1297. But the freedom was short-lived and Wallace and the Scots army were defeated at Falkirk in 1298. It is important to remember that Wallace was not fighting to gain the throne of Scotland but in order to free the country from English domination. It is for that reason, as well as the heroic battles, that he has been put on a pedestal over the years (both literally, with many statues, and metaphorically).

Robert the Bruce was initially prepared to kneel before King Edward of England but in 1306 he declared himself king of Scotland. His fight against the English was long and hard and it took until the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314 to fully set Scotland free - at least for a time.

Resurectinng an old feature, first posted over a year ago.

Good Morning from Scotland

Good Morning from Scotland

I still can’t get use the wheel being there in Summer

I still can’t get use the wheel being there in Summer

Neil Armstrong in Langholm 1972Langholm is the traditional seat of Clan Armstrong, making it Neil’s ancestral home town. At the time of the moon landing, the town clerk was Eddie Armstrong, who issued the invitation for Neil Armstrong to become the town’s first and only Freeman.To the astonishment of all involved, the moon walker accepted.He visited in 1972 with his wife to accept the honour. Men, women and children lined the streets to cheer and wave in welcome. At the ceremony address he told the audience, “The most difficult place to be recognised is in one’s own home town, I consider this, now, my home town.”

Neil Armstrong in Langholm 1972

Langholm is the traditional seat of Clan Armstrong, making it Neil’s ancestral home town. At the time of the moon landing, the town clerk was Eddie Armstrong, who issued the invitation for Neil Armstrong to become the town’s first and only Freeman.

To the astonishment of all involved, the moon walker accepted.

He visited in 1972 with his wife to accept the honour. Men, women and children lined the streets to cheer and wave in welcome. At the ceremony address he told the audience, “The most difficult place to be recognised is in one’s own home town, I consider this, now, my home town.”

I love the fact that even though I am not in Edinburgh anymore my lovely wee sister takes pics almost every day on her way to work around 6.30 am

Good Morning from Scotland

Good Morning from Scotland