A class of barefoot children, Milton Street School, Dumbiedykes, Edinburgh 1895.

A class of barefoot children, Milton Street School, Dumbiedykes, Edinburgh 1895.

While I’m worth my room on this earth I will be with you………
Sunshine on Leith, great songs,great story and lots of fantastic shots of my home city of Edinburgh close pop ups do not download anything, great copy to watch, and free!!!  Please watch and enjoy, comments welcome afterwards  
http://www.merdb.cn/external.php?gd=1891463186&title=Sunshine+on+Leith&url=aHR0cDovL3RoZWZpbGUubWUvcndjdWZ1bHJuaG9x&domain=dGhlZmlsZS5tZQ==&loggedin=0

While I’m worth my room on this earth I will be with you………

Sunshine on Leith, great songs,great story and lots of fantastic shots of my home city of Edinburgh close pop ups do not download anything, great copy to watch, and free!!!  Please watch and enjoy, comments welcome afterwards 

http://www.merdb.cn/external.php?gd=1891463186&title=Sunshine+on+Leith&url=aHR0cDovL3RoZWZpbGUubWUvcndjdWZ1bHJuaG9x&domain=dGhlZmlsZS5tZQ==&loggedin=0

Princes Street, Edinburgh by University of Glasgow Library on Flickr.Light traffic on a quiet Princes Street, Edinburgh, West End, March 1913, you will notice the street was cobbled back then

Princes Street, Edinburgh by University of Glasgow Library on Flickr.

Light traffic on a quiet Princes Street, Edinburgh, West End, March 1913, you will notice the street was cobbled back then

A view over the bustling Isle of Bute port of Rothesay in its Victorian heyday (Adamson Collection) by Scottish Maritime Museum - SMM on Flickr.The demon drink:
A trip to Rothesay or Dunoon was seen as a break from the grim reality of everyday life, and became notorious for the “hurly-burly” of “herds of savages and drunken rabbles”. Some operators took this even further and introduced steamer services on Sundays, exploiting loopholes in the drink laws to allow alcohol to be served onboard their usually rundown vessels. This sort of behaviour was not appreciated by some fellow travellers, who welcomed the introduction of the alcohol-free steamer Ivanhoe in the 1880s, which was “characterised by peace and comfort”. This was not always the case, however: some gentlemen passengers used to take hip flasks full of whisky with them, and as a result “an Ivanhoe” became a nickname for these flasks at the time!

A view over the bustling Isle of Bute port of Rothesay in its Victorian heyday (Adamson Collection) by Scottish Maritime Museum - SMM on Flickr.

The demon drink:

A trip to Rothesay or Dunoon was seen as a break from the grim reality of everyday life, and became notorious for the “hurly-burly” of “herds of savages and drunken rabbles”. Some operators took this even further and introduced steamer services on Sundays, exploiting loopholes in the drink laws to allow alcohol to be served onboard their usually rundown vessels. This sort of behaviour was not appreciated by some fellow travellers, who welcomed the introduction of the alcohol-free steamer Ivanhoe in the 1880s, which was “characterised by peace and comfort”. This was not always the case, however: some gentlemen passengers used to take hip flasks full of whisky with them, and as a result “an Ivanhoe” became a nickname for these flasks at the time!

St Kilda post office showing local women and children with their dogs (c1920s) by University of Glasgow Library on Flickr.The post office was located on Main Street on the island of Hirta, St Kilda.

St Kilda post office showing local women and children with their dogs (c1920s) by University of Glasgow Library on Flickr.

The post office was located on Main Street on the island of Hirta, St Kilda.

asker

luckyschultz asked: No ? ~ just a big good morning. Love ur blogs name, content even better. Thanx, from the Gunks, Hudson Valley, NY

Good morning to you as well, your tumblr is…..interesting in places!! x

Edinburgh’s Christmas website is being updated with this years events at the moment but I can reveal that for all those with an EH postcode you will get 20% off shows and rides, not sure how it will work but keep your eye on the site. The Big wheel will be back and the Star Rider will be moving to the gardens, the ice rink is moving to St Andrews Square, round the edges and in the middle and accessed by footbridge, the square will also have a Helter Skelter.It all kicks off with the light up on November 23rd, also this year the St Andrews Day celebrations will be in St Andrews Square, which I find rather apt, oh and get the kids along that day for free ice skating. Details still being anounced keep your eye on the web page.
http://www.edinburghschristmas.com/

Edinburgh’s Christmas website is being updated with this years events at the moment but I can reveal that for all those with an EH postcode you will get 20% off shows and rides, not sure how it will work but keep your eye on the site. The Big wheel will be back and the Star Rider will be moving to the gardens, the ice rink is moving to St Andrews Square, round the edges and in the middle and accessed by footbridge, the square will also have a Helter Skelter.It all kicks off with the light up on November 23rd, also this year the St Andrews Day celebrations will be in St Andrews Square, which I find rather apt, oh and get the kids along that day for free ice skating. Details still being anounced keep your eye on the web page.

http://www.edinburghschristmas.com/

On this day in 1813 John Rae, explorer and surveyor of Canada’s northern coastline was born in Orkney.
Several Orkney born explorers worked in the Canadian Arctic in the employ of the Hudson’s Bay Company, but Rae was the most outstanding. He received The Royal Geographical Society’s Founder’s Gold Medal in 1852 for the scientific results of his first two explorations, but it is for the achievements on his third journey that he is best remembered. In 1845, John Franklin had disappeared trying to find the North West Passage. Several attempts to locate the party were made, but in 1854 Rae discovered the first traces of the Franklin expedition. All members of the expedition had died either due to hunger or cold. He used the reward money he received for locating the missing explorers to buy a schooner and spent the next few years doing survey work in Canada, mostly for the overland telegraph.

On this day in 1813 John Rae, explorer and surveyor of Canada’s northern coastline was born in Orkney.

Several Orkney born explorers worked in the Canadian Arctic in the employ of the Hudson’s Bay Company, but Rae was the most outstanding. He received The Royal Geographical Society’s Founder’s Gold Medal in 1852 for the scientific results of his first two explorations, but it is for the achievements on his third journey that he is best remembered. In 1845, John Franklin had disappeared trying to find the North West Passage. Several attempts to locate the party were made, but in 1854 Rae discovered the first traces of the Franklin expedition. All members of the expedition had died either due to hunger or cold. He used the reward money he received for locating the missing explorers to buy a schooner and spent the next few years doing survey work in Canada, mostly for the overland telegraph.

Good Morning from Scotland  

Good Morning from Scotland  

Time for bed 
Oidhche mhath (oykah vah)

Time for bed

Oidhche mhath (oykah vah)

The centrepiece of a typical scottish livingroom

The centrepiece of a typical scottish livingroom

Nothing to see here just a Model T Ford on top of our highest mountain
In 1911 Henry Alexander jr – the son of an Edinburgh Ford dealer decided to  drive to the summit of Ben Nevis in a 20 horsepower Ford Model T, carried out to attract the attention of the press and prove how rugged the Model T was. The driver encountered rocks, boulders, snowdrifts, and loose sandy paths. The whole ascent actually took much longer, about ten days, as the team scouted out a suitable path for the car to follow, and organised bridging. The return trip down the mountain took barely three hours, perhaps assisted by the gradient, which exceeded 1 in 3 in places. Said only to have adjusted the brakes when he reached Fort William, Mr Alexander jr drove the car home to Edinburgh.

Nothing to see here just a Model T Ford on top of our highest mountain

In 1911 Henry Alexander jr – the son of an Edinburgh Ford dealer decided to  drive to the summit of Ben Nevis in a 20 horsepower Ford Model T, carried out to attract the attention of the press and prove how rugged the Model T was. The driver encountered rocks, boulders, snowdrifts, and loose sandy paths. The whole ascent actually took much longer, about ten days, as the team scouted out a suitable path for the car to follow, and organised bridging. The return trip down the mountain took barely three hours, perhaps assisted by the gradient, which exceeded 1 in 3 in places. Said only to have adjusted the brakes when he reached Fort William, Mr Alexander jr drove the car home to Edinburgh.

Ben Nevis by 3peaker on Flickr."Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud
Upon the top of Nevis, blind in mist!
I look into the chasms, and a shroud
Vapurous doth hide them - just so much I wist
Mankind do know of hell; I look o’erhead,
And there is sullen mist, - even so much
Mankind can tell of heaven; mist is spread
Before the earth, beneath me, - even such,
Even so vague is man’s sight of himself!
Here are the craggy stones beneath my feet, -
Thus much I know that, a poor witless elf,
I tread on them, - that all my eye doth meet
Is mist and crag, not only on this height,
But in the world of thought and mental might!”
Written on the summit by John Keats

Ben Nevis by 3peaker on Flickr.

"Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud
Upon the top of Nevis, blind in mist!
I look into the chasms, and a shroud
Vapurous doth hide them - just so much I wist
Mankind do know of hell; I look o’erhead,
And there is sullen mist, - even so much
Mankind can tell of heaven; mist is spread
Before the earth, beneath me, - even such,
Even so vague is man’s sight of himself!
Here are the craggy stones beneath my feet, -
Thus much I know that, a poor witless elf,
I tread on them, - that all my eye doth meet
Is mist and crag, not only on this height,
But in the world of thought and mental might!”

Written on the summit by John Keats

A couple of pics taken a wee while ago and sent to me from my Wee Sister, this is the view from her room at The Oak Tree Inn, in the beautiful loch side village of Balmaha in Loch Lomond & The Trossachs National Park.

Hielan Coo posing on Conic Hill above Loch Lomond.

Hielan Coo posing on Conic Hill above Loch Lomond.